May 25, 2007

Happiness Is A Warm Bun Part 2

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Crusty Salty Pan de Sal with Cheese Pimiento Spread
crusty pandesal filled with cheese pimiento

Pancit And Pan De Sal
if you're weird like me, soft pan de sal with pancit guisado (rice noodles)

I wrote about my love for sweet breads, rolls and buns before, this time I made 2 kinds of buns called Pan de Sal (salted bread), the crusty, salty ones and the soft, sweetish kind. The latter are more popular in the Philippines. Who doesn't love pillowy soft, sweet bread? The pan de sal is very similar to the Spanish country bread and French baguette but the Filipinos love sweet things and added more sugar, some butter and egg to the original recipe. Honestly, I love both kinds either with butter or filled with sausages and other meat spreads.

Crusty Pan de Sal
1 tablespoon oil
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar
2 cups warm water
2 teaspoons dry yeast
5 cups bread flour
very fine bread crumbs
  • In a stand mixer bowl, combine ½ cup water, sugar and yeast, mix well. Let stand for 5 minutes. Add the remaining water and 2 cups flour. Attach paddle and mix for 1 minute, add salt and oil and the rest of the flour, mix for 2 minutes. Replace paddle with dough hook and knead for 5 minutes until smooth and elastic. Transfer into a lightly greased container, cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place for 1½ hours. Punch dough down, divide into 24 pieces and shape into ovals. Roll in bread crumbs, place slightly apart on a cookie sheet. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise for 1 hour. Bake in a pre-heated 425°F oven for 15 to 20 minutes or until golden brown.
Soft Pan de Sal
1¼ cups water
¼ cup warm water
2 teaspoons dry yeast
5 tablespoons unsalted butter
¼ cup powdered milk
1 egg, at room temperature
2 teaspoons salt
½ cup sugar
4 cups bread flour
very fine bread crumbs
  • In a stand mixer, combine 1 tablespoon sugar, warm water and yeast, mix well. Let stand for 5 minutes. In a small bowl heat water and butter for 30 seconds. Add to the bowl with 2 cups of flour, the rest of the sugar, powdered milk and egg. With paddle attached, mix for 1 minute. Add salt and the rest of the flour, mix for 1 minute. Replace paddle with dough hook and knead for 5 minutes. Dough will be a little sticky. Place dough in a lightly greased container, cover with plastic wrap and let rise for 1 hour. Punch dough down, divide into 24 ovals, roll in breadcrumbs. Place in an ungreased 13 x 9 inch pan, rolls touching. Cover and let rise for 40 minutes to 1 hour and bake in a pre-heated 400°F oven for 15 minutes.
Soft and Sweet Pan de Sal (Buns)
arrange soft buns touching for height support

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

I tried the recipe for soft pan de sal yesterday and it was absolutely perfect! My family was impressed! Thanks!

Anonymous said...

Hi oggi,
just a question. did u use instant yeast? or active dry yeast? thanks :)

oggi said...

Hi,
I used active dry. If you have instant yeast, use a third less and mix it with half of the flour or use as directed. I think the difference is, instant has smaller grains and dissolves and acts faster than regular active dry yeast but they are basically the same.

Anonymous said...

Hi Oggi,
I tried making your soft pandesal recipe, it was really good. Love it :)
Just a question, was the dough really sticky? im having a hard time shaping it because everything is sticking on my hand.
and do you know the cheese bread on filipino bakeries? do you have a recipe for that?
I dont know why they call it cheesebread, it doesnt have any cheese and its sweet.

Thanks :)

oggi said...

Yes, the dough should be a bit sticky but will become tacky after intensive kneading. I lightly oil my hands for easier handling and to avoid adding flour because I think the extra moisture makes the buns softer.

I haven't heard of cheesebread. Now you got me very curious and because I'm a tad obsessive, I'll look in my ancient Filipino cookbook.:)

oggi said...

Hey, I suddenly remembered the Portuguese tartlets called queijadas which means cheese tarts but don't have any cheese in it. Cheesebread, I haven't found any. I'll keep looking. Do you have a photo or description?

Anonymous said...

Is the powdered milk necessary? Is there a substitute?

oggi said...

Anon, you can use scalded and cooled to lukewarm fresh milk in place of the needed 1¼ cups water.

Anonymous said...

Hi! Tried baking for the 1st time and it went almost perfect. My problem was that the bottom of the buns were a bit burnt though i positioned the tray way up high. How can i fix it? Thanks!

Oggi said...

Hi Anon
You can put the sheet pan on top of another pan, line the pan with parchment paper, or use an Airbake pan which is double layered with space in between the layers.

Anonymous said...

hi, have you ever made pandesal with evaporated milk instead of powdered milk?

Oggi said...

Anon@ 1/29/14
Nope. I use powdered or fresh whole milk.

Anonymous said...

Hi
Made a batch(64) of soft pandesal for the annual Choir holiday, managed to keep some soft for 5 days - most went for breakfast on day 1 and everyone loved them, this recipe has now made it to the top of my list. Thanks

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