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June 30, 2009

Millet Suman

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Millet Suman
budbud kabog (millet and coconut milk rolls)

Suman, a Filipino snack wrapped in banana leaves is usually made of either raw or precooked glutinous rice. The bundles are boiled in plain water for about an hour and they are best eaten with ripe mangoes, with coconut milk sauce, or simply dipped in sugar. About three years ago I read about the millet seed suman which is a favorite in the Visayan region of the Philippines. The seeds are precooked in coconut milk before rolling into fat cigar shape and wrapping in banana leaves.

I've never had millet suman before which has a rather funny name, Budbud Kabog, and I have no idea what it means. And I always thought millet seeds are for making birdseed and suet cakes. I found millet seeds at the health food aisle of the Asian grocery. Koreans cook them in rice together with red and black beans. I bought 2 kinds [because I don't know what kind they use in the Philippines], glutinous, from India, which are green in color like green mungbeans, and the yellow-colored non-glutinous from Korea.

I mixed the 2 millets, about ¾ cup of each, washed them thoroughly, then cooked them in a large wok in coconut milk and added water (as needed) until the seeds are soft, then added 3 tablespoons of sugar and ½ teaspoon sea salt. The suman is good, not better than glutinous rice suman, but I like it because I'm a sucker for anything cooked in coconut milk and wrapped in fragrant banana leaves. I actually like the soft grains which are almost like corn grits or tiny quinoa. It was worth the time making them and I love it with ripe mangoes of course. *Now, why do I suddenly have the urge to chirp?*

Millet Suman
the suman is pale yellow, almost white, maybe because of the green seeds

Here is the recipe which I modified using canned coconut milk.

Suman
left: glutinous rice suman with coconut milk and raw sugar sauce
right: glutinous and non-glutinous rice suman with chocolate and peanuts

June 29, 2009

Cinnamon Buns And Sticky Buns

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Cinnamon Bun
glazed cinnamon bun

Sticky Buns
sticky buns with chopped macadamia nuts

The Bread Baker's Apprentice Challenge 8th recipe is for Cinnamon Buns and Sticky Buns. After reading the recipe for the caramel glaze, I couldn't resist making the sticky buns. I halved the rolled dough and the slices from one half dough went into a 9-inch round cake pan, the bottom layered with ¼ inch of the caramel paste and a few tablespoons of chopped macadamia nuts (I ran out of pecans). I love this gooey caramel glaze, it is very good.

Cinnamon Buns
the caramel was bubbling like magma while baking

Cinnamon Bun
sticky gooey goodness


The other half of the dough was mistakenly divided into 8 portions and placed on the baking pan too far apart. I wanted thick cinnamon buns but it was already cut and they came out a little bit thin. Oh well, I can always bake another batch and make them into gigantic cinnamon buns. And the good thing is they become crispy when toasted and sinfully indulgent if paired with David Lebovitz's Salted Butter Caramel ice cream...it's like eating an open-face ice cream sandwich, sooo addicting.

Cinnamon Bun and Ice Cream
toasted cinnamon bun, not just for breakfast anymore...
try it with Salted Butter Caramel Ice cream for a super duper delicious dessert or snack

The recipe does not have a layer of soft butter on the flattened dough before sprinkling the cinnamon sugar mixture. Most recipes I know have at least 2 tablespoons of soft butter for a moist cinnamon bun. But I want to follow the recipe as written so I used just cinnamon sugar and I expected the cinnamon buns to be a bit dry. Thankfully they are not and the bread itself is moist, soft, and delicious. I still prefer them with butter cinnamon sugar combo and I drizzle the insides of the coil with a little melted butter before glazing and eating. I just have to have my butter.:-)

Cinnamon Buns
I leave them bare and glaze them just before serving

Rating:
flavor 4
texture 5
visual appeal 5
ease of preparation 4
performance 5
worth 4
Total: 27
Average: 4.5

June 27, 2009

Lasang Pinoy, Sundays: Beef Tapa

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Beef Tapa
a favorite pulutan: beef tapa

This week's Lasang Pinoy, Sundays: Strips. First thing that came to mind was beef tapa, strips of thinly sliced cured beef, then fried crisp and enjoyed with garlic fried rice and a fried egg or two, the original TapSiLog. It is also a favorite pulutan (appetizer) to munch on while drinking ice cold San Miguel® beer.

Beef Tapa
TapSiLog is eaten with vinegar spiced with super hot bird's eye chili pepper
or tomatoes sprinkled with sea salt



a weekly food photography meme, Pinoy style, is hosted by SpiCes.


Beef Tapa
1 pound thinly sliced beef, cut into 1-inch wide strips
1 cup pineapple juice
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar
1/8 tsp pink salt, optional
1 to 2 tablespoons oil for frying
  • Mix pieapple juice, salt, sugar, and pink salt if using. Coat the meat evenly, put in a gallon freezer zipper bag and marinate overnight in the refrigerator. The next day, drain the meat and discard marinade. Pat the meat dry with paper towels. Put slices on racks and place the racks on baking sheets. Dry the beef in a warm oven (less than 200° F) for 1 to 2 hours. Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a skillet and shallow fry beef until crisp.

June 24, 2009

Butifarra And Mashed Potatoes Tapa

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Butifarra and Mashed Potatoes Tapa
tiny Spanish sausages and mashed potatoes appetizer

Tapas are small plates of Spanish appetizers usually eaten in between meals to go with wine. The most common tapas are potato tortilla (omelet), fried chorizos, mushrooms in garlic sauce, cured olives, and prawns also in garlic sauce.

I borrowed this tapa combination of Spanish chorizos on a bed of mashed potatoes from the Food section of The Washington Post. The tiny chorizos were grilled and served on a very silky soft mashed potatoes. I made butifarra, another type of Spanish sausage which is very mild compared to chorizo, twisting them every one inch and cooked them on a skillet instead of the grill. I separated them after they were cooked. For the mashed potatoes, I boiled yukon gold with salt and a whole garlic clove. I used the cooking water to make a very soft fluffy mashed potatoes and added about 3 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil in place of butter. This is a very delicious appetizer or dinner.

Butifarra And Mashed Potatoes Tapa

My recipe for Spanish chorizo is here. Twist every one inch to make into tiny chorizos. Or slice store-bought chorizos into ¾ inch pieces after cooking.

Next time I'll attempt to make José Andrés' deep fried chorizos wrapped in paper thin slices of potatoes. This one sounds really good.

June 22, 2009

Ciabatta

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Ciabatta
Ciabatta
5-ounce ciabatta

The Bread Baker's Apprentice Challenge recipe 7: Ciabatta. This Italian rustic crusty chewy bread shaped like a slipper has become so popular and when a restaurant started to serve sandwiches using ciabatta several years ago I was eager to try but was so disappointed at first bite. The bread was incredibly leathery or maybe flip-floppy; I thought I was chewing on rawhide. And the bakeries are no better with their mediocre ciabatta but thanks to BBA and other cookbooks, not to mention several websites, I am now able to have freshly baked ciabatta at home that are flavorful and yes chewy but not rubbery.

For this challenge I [again] forgot to take photos of the unbaked dough. Sorry about that. Anyway, I divided the dough into four 5-ounce sandwich rolls and the remainder of the dough I shaped into a long thin baguette. The rolls were shaped like a letter just like in the photos and I put them on individual pieces of parchment, uncouched. It is easier to slide them one by one from the peel onto the baking stone.

For this recipe I used a poolish which I left in the refrigerator for 2 days to develop more flavor. The ciabatta recipe is easy to follow but I find the dough a little bit dry and had to sprinkle a lot of water while kneading because the wetter the dough the more hole-y the bread will turn out. I honestly thought even with the additional water I felt the dough was still dry. And this is what's odd about this batch: three of the sandwich ciabatta rolls have random large air pockets but one didn't have any, just a few medium and small ones. The baguette also has irregular medium and tiny holes in them. I can't believe these are from the same dough. I suspect my oven has cold spots and I should have baked them in batches. But overall, I like this recipe; the bread is chewy, crusty although not as dark brown as I would have liked, and definitely more flavorful than store-bought. I love it with crisp-fried pancetta, lettuce, and tomato or simply halved and baked topped with mozzarella and parmesan cheese seasoned with dried Italian herbs. I probably will NOT use this recipe again for my next ciabatta as I have PR's ciabatta test recipe for his upcoming book.

Ciabatta
the baguette and one roll have few small air pockets, the one at the front right is hole-y

PLT
PLT
PLT: pancetta, lettuce, and tomato

Ciabatta Cheese Melt
crunchy crust, chewy crumb, gooey mozzarella, yummy Parmesan


Rating:
flavor 4
texture 4
visual appeal 4
ease of preparation 4
performance 4
worth 4
Total: 24
Average: 4

June 20, 2009

Guinomis

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Guinomis
Guinomis

Guinomis, also spelled with a U, guinumis is a Filipino dessert or snack similar to Halo-Halo. It has diced sweet gelatin, tapioca pearls, puffed pinipig (pounded young glutinous rice), sweetened with raw sugar and pandan syrup, and topped with shaved ice and coconut milk. You will love the different textures of chewy sago and gelatin, crunchy pinipig, creamy coconut milk, and cool mouth feel of the shaved ice. Perfect for summer and sooo yummy.

Guinomis (adapted from KULINARYA guidebook)
diced cooked red agar or gelatin, flavored with lemon extract
cooked sago (large tapioca pearls)
puffed pinipig
2 cups water
3 pandan leaves
2 pieces panocha (or 1½ cups muscovado or raw sugar)
thin coconut milk
shaved ice
  • Prepare the syrup: Boil the pandan leaves, water, and panocha or sugar. Simmer, uncovered, and stir until sugar has dissolved completely. Reduce until syrupy. Let cool. Discard pandan and transfer syrup into a serving container or bottle.
  • Assemble the guinomis: Layer 3 tablespoons each: sago pearls, gulaman, pinipig. Drizzle syrup to taste, top with shaved ice, pour 3 to 4 tablespoons of coconut milk. Enjoy!
Guinomis

Panocha and Gur
panocha and gur

Philippine panocha is available at Filipino and Asian groceries. Gur, the Pakistani and Indian raw sugar lumps are available in the international food section of most groceries (at least in my area). Dark muscovado sugar and raw sugar are also available in many groceries usually at the baking/flour/sugar aisle. You can use regular dark brown sugar but the flavor won't be as good as the panocha.

Lasang Pinoy, Sundays: turns ONE!

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ube cupcakes for LaPiS' first birthday

Lasang Pinoy, Sundays, a weekly gallery of food photography, Filipino style, turns ONE. Congratulations to all and thanks to Ces of SpiCes. Now, let us eat ube cupcakes!:-)

June 13, 2009

Cherry And Kirsch Gratin

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Cherry Gratin

Early June is the best time to make cherry desserts when they're abundant and cheap. Every year I buy large containers of bing and rainier cherries for snacking. I also preserve them with sugar and cherry brandy to add to cakes, ice cream, cookies, etc. For this week's Lasang Pinoy Sundays, blame it on the A-A-A-Alcohol, I made a cherry and kirsch gratin, the recipe adapted from PURE DESSERT by Alice Medrich. I love that the cherry liqueur/white wine combination is not very strong because at least some of the alcohol evaporates in the cooking process; rather it enhances the flavor of the cherries and the custard. I a-a-azhzhure you my speech wasn't slurred after consuming a large bowl of the spiked cherry dessert.;-)

Lasang Pinoy Sundays, a weekly gallery of food photography Pinoy-style, is hosted by SpiCes.

Bing Cherries

recipe adapted from PURE DESSERT by Alice Medrich
Cherry And Kirsch Gratin
for the topping
3 large egg yolks
3 tablespoons sugar
1¼ tablespoons flour
1/3 cup dry white wine
3 tablespoons kirschwasser
¼ cup plus 1½ tablespoons heavy cream

for the fruit
1 cup sweet cherries
1½ tablespoons kirschwasser
½ tablespoon sugar, or to taste
½ teaspoon fresh lemon juice, or to taste
  • To make the topping: Set a medium bowl next to the stove. In a medium stainless steel saucepan, whisk the egg yolks with the sugar and flour until well blended. Whisk in the wine and kirschwasser. Cook over medium heat whisking constantly until the mixture becomes a thick custard. Continue to whisk for 2 minutes (to cook the flour), or until the custard becomes less thick and slightly translucent. Immediately scrape the custard into the bowl. Stir in 1½ tablespoons cream. Place a piece of plastic film on top to prevent a skin from forming. Refrigerate until cool.
  • To prepare the fruit: Pit and halve the cherries. Place them in a bowl, add the kirschwasser, sugar, and lemon juice, stir, and let macerate for at least 15 minutes or for several hours at room temperature. Preheat the broiler with the rack 6 inches from the heat. Taste and adjust sugar and lemon juice. Scrape the cherries and juices into a 4 x 6 oval dish and spread evenly. Broil until cherries are slightly tender and the juices are bubbling, about 5 to 6 minutes. Remove the pan and set aside to cool slightly for 10 minutes. Whip the remaining cream until almost stiff. Fold into the cold custard. Spread the mixture on top of the cherries. Slide under the broiler to brown the top, this may take only a minute or less. Serve warm or at room temperature.
Speaking of liquor, you may want to check out my Lambanog mixed drink.:-)

Challah

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Challah
22-ounce woven round challah with golden raisins

I can't believe The Bread Baker's Apprentice Challenge is already on its 6th week and my enthusiasm for baking hasn't waned. Maybe because this week it's Challah, one of our favorite breads from the first time I saw its dark golden bumpy crust at the grocery. The grocery-store variety are not the very best tasting challah yet I bought the loaves on a regular basis. I only started baking them when I saw a sweet potato recipe and we had it for Thanksgiving dinner last year. It was sweet and delicious. For Christmas I baked a regular one [also] with dried cranberries in the dough. Equally yummy.

I had always wanted to try my hand at shaping a round challah that I see on the web and this challenge has encouraged me to make it. The BBA has instructions for a 2-strand braid but I wanted a 4-strand round. I found this with step by step photographs on how to shape a woven round challah, very easy to follow. After finishing weaving and the dough turned over I was so satisfied and happy with myself for accomplishing something I thought was too complicated.

BBAC Challah

The challah recipe in BBA is one of the easiest and fastest to make which means you get to eat the fruits of your labor in just a few hours. I love its tasty very soft yet chewy crumb and the fact that it has no butter. For the oil, I usually use extra light olive oil or grapeseed oil because both oils are the most neutral tasting and healthy too as they can help raise the "good" cholesterol level. I also read that olive oil increases the shelf life of baked goods which is a plus. I divided the dough into two 22-ounce pieces, one I made into a 4-strand braid. I forgot to take photos of the braiding process. I didn't use the book's instructions as the previous braids I made using this method somehow looked uneven, I can't explain why. I followed the braiding technique in this video instead and the braid came out good. No matter how it looks, lopsided or perfectly shaped, the BBA Challah is number one in my book.:)

BBAC Challah
Challah
bumpy but yummy

BBAC Challah
great for grilled cheese sandwich: grated Gouda, apple carpaccio, and fig preserves

Rating:
flavor 5
texture 5
visual appeal 5
ease of preparation 5
performance 5
worth 5
Total: 30
Average: a perfect 5

June 10, 2009

Apple Carpaccio

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Orange Blossom Mint Ice Cream and Apple Carpaccio
apple carpaccio with orange blossom and mint ice cream

Alice Medrich in her cookbook PURE DESSERT has a recipe for microwaved thinly sliced apples she calls Summer Apple Carpaccio. The apple halves take 45 seconds to cook in the microwave oven and have less than a teaspoon of sugar each. The apple slices become soft and almost transparent but still crunchy and they are served either fanned or shaped to look like garden roses. She suggests pairing them with Rose Water and Mint ice cream or drizzle with caramel ssauce. I adapted her ice cream recipe using orange blossom water because I was not sure if I will like the rose water flavor, doubled the mint leaves for a stronger mint flavor, and increased the milk by just half a cup. The ice cream flavors are so good together and perfect with the simple sweet apple. And the rose apple "petals" look pretty and fun to eat. The apples are also fantastic with Salted Caramel ice cream.

recipes are adapted from PURE DESSERT by Alice Medrich
Apple Carpaccio
  • Cut the apples in half lengthwise. Peel and core. Place one half apple cut side down on a cutting board and cut crosswise into 1/8 inch slices, leaving the slices in place. Transfer into a saucer, sprinkle with ½ to 1 teaspoon sugar, cover with a bowl, and microwave on high for 45 seconds (1000 watts oven). Cook one half apple at a time.
  • Fan the cooked apple and transfer on a serving plate using an offset spatula. Or shape into roses. Cool completely before shaping. Twist the middle slice without removing it, into a cone to form the bud at the center of the rose. Wrap one or two adjacent slices partially around the bud to resemble the inner petals of the rose. Continue to arrange the adjacent slices, working from the center outward, until the apple looks like an open garden rose. Use an offset spatula to transfer the rose to a serving plate.
Apple Carpaccio
cooks in 45 seconds and shaping takes a few minutes

Orange Blossom Water And Mint Ice Cream
1 cup whole milk
12 mint leaves
½ cup sugar
1½ teaspoons orange blossom water, more or less to taste
2½ cups heavy whipping cream
  • Blend the mint leaves and milk in a blender. Strain milk through a very fine sieve into a measuring bowl with spout. Add the sugar and stir until completely dissolved. Add the orange blossom water and heavy whipping cream, stir to combine. Pour into an ice cream maker and churn for 20 minutes. Transfer into an ice cream container and freeze until scoopable. Serve with apple carpaccio rose.

June 7, 2009

BBAC: Casatiello

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Casatiello
with steamed asparagus for brunch

Casatiello
and fresh strawberries for breakfast

I love the fifth bread in the BBAC, Casatiello. I am so glad I joined this baking challenge because I would never have paid attention to this bread if I hadn't. Whenever I flip through the book I always skip it thinking it's just another version of brioche and it actually is. The difference is, this Italian cousin of brioche is filled with meat and cheese. It's a savory buttery delicious bread which I enjoy very much for breakfast with fresh fruits and for brunch with steamed asparagus. It's also very good with a sprinkling of powdered sugar or a drizzle of maple syrup, both sugary additions complement the toasted slices.

Casatiello

I filled the bread with diced mortadella and grated Asiago pressato. I like the mild flavor of the mortadella, think Spam only better, and I love the bits of fat and whole black peppercorns in it. The meat and cheese came out evenly distributed throughout the bread but I would have liked more filling and should have increased the amount by at least ¼ cup of each.

Casatiello
baked in a small loaf pan and 12-ounce coffee cans

I like this bread so much I baked a second batch (half a recipe), filled it with sopressata and a combination of diced Asiago pressato and coarsely grated young Gouda, and because I wanted to celebrate my "discovery" of this bread I baked it in a bundt pan. Taking a needed break from too much butter, I used extra virgin olive oil to replace almost all of the butter. I'm not sure if it is the olive oil but the second batch is more tender and flakier but just as delicious as the all-butter Casatiello; the flavor of the oil is very subtle, btw.

Casatiello
I can't believe this is half a recipe: the dough more than doubled in bulk after 50 minutes of proofing and had a good oven spring too, filling the pan almost to the top

Casatiello
Casatiello
it looks purty durn yummy

Casatiello
specially with sweet wine

Rating:
flavor 5
texture 5
visual appeal 5
ease of preparation 5
performance 5
worth 5
Total: 30
Average: a perfect 5, another winner. Woohoo!

June 6, 2009

Lasang Pinoy, Sundays: Resto-rant

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Turo Turoturo-turo in Falls Church, Virginia

Filipino Turo-turo in Virginiathe usual: daing na bangus, menudo, pork sinigang, bangus sinigang, ox-tail kare-kare, pork/chicken adobo, skewered pork barbecue, and my favorite, lechon kawali

Lasang Pinoy, Sundays is hosted by SpiCes. This week: Resto-rant

I apologize if I have turned this food photography meme into a long Rant And Rave post.:D

The Resto-rave: The turo-turo pictured above is inside a Filipino grocery store called Manila Oriental [in Falls Church, Northern Virginia]. The turo-turo, located at the very rear of the store, has 3 tiny tables and a few stools which were all occupied when we got there. I am normally not attracted to turo-turo because the food always seem to look dry and stale but this store is a huge improvement. Although the grocery store is dusty and overflowing with stuff, the turo-turo area is bright and clean. It has a lot of customers judging from the long line and wait for the tables, although most are carry-out. I had the lechon kawali and my husband the Kare-kare, both are superb. The hot delicious food which are freshly cooked right there and are replenished constantly while we were eating have changed my view of turo-turo restaurants from meh to a very positive one. When I asked permission to photograph the place, the girl at the counter presumed we were video cam wielding tourists from the Philippines, and said "greetings from Virginia to our kababayans!" :-)

The Resto-rant: I had a rather unpleasant experience with a Filipino restaurant several months ago. The owner left a comment in one of my posts advertising his place, which shall remain nameless, in Maryland. I got excited when I saw sisig on the menu posted on their website which also has photos of the restaurant. It looks large and airy, cozy, and has plenty of tables. I immediately linked the restaurant's website to my blog to help out a fellow Pinoy promote his restaurant. We didn't mind the 1 hour drive through light rain/snow because we are always on the lookout around my area for sit-down restaurants that has the potential to serve really good Filipino food. I was disappointed but not discouraged to discover that most of the food are not a la carte but also turo-turo style that need to be reheated upon ordering/pointing. A few dishes can be cooked to order, one of them is sisig which was what we went there for. I ordered the sisig and he got his usual Kare-kare and a vegetable dish from the buffet (boy, aren't we boring and predictable?). The Kare-kare was okay but nothing to rave about. The moment the not-so-sizzling sisig arrived and set on the table, my pork-eschewing husband said "ugh!, smells awful, rancid, and too porky", whatever the heck porky means. The strong smell of the sisig which didn't bother me was making him ill so I moved it far away from his sensitive nose. The sisig was not good at all not because it was spoiled or something, rather it lacked flavor, heat, acidity, and crunch, but I ate half of it because the owners were sort of "observing" me. I was such a wimp because I didn't say anything to them. Should I have said something? Would you have if you found yourself in the same situation: a promising Filipino restaurant with enthusiastic owners but the food they serve are mediocre at best, at least IMHO. Would you have the courage to tell them the food need some improvements? Maybe it was our fault for not ordering something like okoy or spring rolls, I don't know. But that was not the worst part of our food trip, though. A few minutes after we got home I became sick from a mild-to-almost-bad case of food poisoning. I never contacted the owners but after a month I removed the restaurant's link from my blog.:(

June 3, 2009

Confetti Slaw

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Confetti Slaw

The weather is getting unbearable already and it's only the first week of June. When it gets hot I crave for vegetable salads which are very refreshing and a breeze to prepare. I was in the mood for coleslaw yesterday but I didn't have cabbages nor green pepper. What I had in the vegetable bin were 2 aging purple carrots, a yellow beet, and lots of sweet peppers and I imagined these vegetables together would make a good slaw. Well, they are more than good, they are great as a slaw.

I used the food processor's medium shredder for the beet and carrots and I sliced the peppers by hand. I added a cup of golden raisins into the mix for a slightly sweet crunchy colorful slaw. Sooo yummy with chicken teriyaki. I will make this salad again with just carrots and jicama with maybe toasted sliced almonds for variety which I think sounds as good if not better.

Confetti Slaw
1 cup shredded yellow beets
1 cup shredded carrots or purple carrots
½ cup thinly sliced sweet yellow pepper
½ cup thinly sliced sweet orange pepper
1 cup golden raisins
3 tablespoons rice wine or cider vinegar
½ tsp salt, or to taste
3 tablespoons sugar, or to taste
  • Put the vegetables and raisins in separate piles in one container. Mix the rice wine or vinegar, sugar, and salt and stir until sugar has completely dissolved. Pour all over the vegetables. Cover and chill for at least 1 hour. Toss and transfer into a serving plate.

June 1, 2009

BBAC: Brioche

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Brioche a tete
à tête

Brioche Nanterre
loaf (Nanterre)

BBA Challenge fourth recipe: Brioche. The book has three options: Rich Man's with 1 pound, yes, 1 pound of butter, Middle-Class with half a pound, and Poor Man's with a quarter pound. I chose the middle class because I've made the poor man's version several times already and although I am more than satisfied with the PM brioche which is perfect for making Croque Monsieur, I want a richer brioche with more butter but not THAT MUCH butter.

The middle-class is very rich and I can't imagine how the rich man's will turn out. I won't know because I have no intention of baking it soon; maybe after we are done with all the recipes I'll take a stab at it. I'm happy with the middle-class with its soft light-as-feather delicious crumb and flaky crust. It's a little bit richer than poor man's as expected but there's very little difference in flavor and texture. Brioche is one of the breads that I will never get tired of. It's easy to prepare and on the eyes, versatile, and did I mention very yummy?

Brioche Dough
proofing in 9-wave brioche (or tortilla) molds

After the first bite of this brioche you'll hear yourself nomnomnom-ing whether it's

Brioche Crumb
torn off by hand

Brioche Crumb
(I love the flaky crust)

Brioche
or neatly sliced

Rating:
flavor 5
texture 5
visual appeal 5
ease of preparation 5
performance 5
worth 5
Total: 30
Average: a perfect 5, yes we have a winner!^__^

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